Child prodigies who couldn't get in

. The complete works of Gustave Flaubert; Romances, travel, comedies, sketches and correspondence; . We could not go into the innermost parts of the rocks before our eyes, to the bottom of the sea, to the end of the sky, to see how the stones grow, how the breaks are made, how the stars are illuminated; We regret that our ears could not catch the rumor of the fermentation of the granite in the bowels of the earth, that the sap was able to circulate in the plants, and that the corals rolled up the solitudes of the ocean. And while we were under the spell of this contemplative effusion, wewi

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. The complete works of Gustave Flaubert; embracing romances, travels, comedies, sketches and correspondence; . at our eyes couldnot penetrate to the innermost parts of the rocks, t the bottom of the sea, to the end of the heavens, inorder to see how the stones grow, how the breakersare made, how the stars are lighted; we regretted that our ears could not catch the rumor of the fermentation of the granite in the bowels of the earth, could not hear the sap circulate in the plants and the coral roll in the solitudes of the ocean. And while we wereunder the spell of that contemplative effusion, wewished that our souls, radiating everywhere, mightlive all these different lives, assume all these dif-ferent forms, and, varying unceasingly, accomplishtheir metamorphoses under an eternal sun! But man was made to enjoy each day only as a small portion of food, colors, sounds, sentiments andideas. Anything above the allotted quantity tires or intoxicates him; it becomes the idiocy of the drunk-ard or the ravings of the ecstatic. O, God I Howsmall is our glass and how large is our thirst! What weak heads we have !. CHAPTER V. Return. N ORDER to return to Quiberon, we were compelled, on the fol-lowing day, to arise before sevenoclock, a feat which required some courage. While we werestill stiff from fatigue and shiver-ing with sleep, we got into a boat along with a white horse, two drummers, the same one-eyed gen-gutme and the same soldier who, this time, however, did not lecture anybody. As drunk as a lord, be kept slipping under the benches and had all he could do tokeep his shako on his head and extricate his gun frombetween his feet. I could not say which was thesillier of the two. The gendarme was sober, but hewas very stupid. He deplored the soldiers lack ofmanners, enumerated the punishments that would bedealt out to him, was ^ scandalized by his hiccoughsand resented his demeanour. Viewed from the side of the missing eye, with his three-cornered hat, hissabre and his yellow gloves, the