What does meta perspective mean

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Questions of meaning and purpose in life are becoming relevant during cancer. Studies have shown that most patients have spiritual needs and that religion / spirituality can be an important resource in coping with illness. So far, only few ... more
Questions of meaning and purpose in life are becoming relevant during cancer. Studies have shown that most patients have spiritual needs and that religion / spirituality can be an important resource in coping with illness. So far, only few studies examine the psychosocial burden and the role of spiritual needs during the treatment process of patients with malignant melanoma. 22 patients were included in this study and assessed for psychosocial distress and spiritual needs while being screened for cancer metastases (t1) and 8 weeks later (t2). Distress, anxiety and depression, further more spiritual needs and religiousness were examined with standardized assessments (HSI, DT, HADS, PHQ-2, SpNQ, SpREUK). All patients express spiritual needs independent of the time of measurement and overall burden. Important needs are the need to be complete and safe, the need for social support, for actively giving and for inner peace and the possibility to talk about anxiety and sorrow. Analyzes have ...
Research Interests:
Religion, Psychology, Quality of life, Humans, Female, and 8 moreMelanoma, Male, Aged, Middle Aged, Adult, Cost of Illness, Cross Sectional Studies, and Psychological Stress
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is established in medicine and psychotherapy and is one of the three recognized psychotherapeutic methods most frequently used in practice. In the Protestant pastoral teaching, ... more
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is established in medicine and psychotherapy and is one of the three recognized psychotherapeutic methods most frequently used in practice. In the Protestant pastoral doctrine, however, this form of therapy has so far hardly been adequately perceived. Although the claim of current poimenics is to critically discuss and receive various psychological and psychotherapeutic currents, there is still a lot of catching up to do here. The relationship between psychology and theology is addressed as a superordinate meta-perspective.
An interface that connects both disciplines is the preoccupation with religion and spirituality. After the boom in pastoral teaching oriented towards psychotherapy in the last few decades, there is now again increasing talk of the perception of religious topics in pastoral discussions. On the psychotherapeutic side, too, religion / spirituality has recently become the subject of psychotherapeutic intervention. Approaches such as meaning-based interventions, spiritual care or spiritual psychotherapy try to incorporate the potentials and conflicts of religion into therapy. New developments in CBT combine methods across schools: e.g. schema therapy, mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) or emotion-focused therapy. These can stimulate further developments in pastoral teaching, but are hardly known there so far.
Representatives of various disciplines should come into conversation during the conference, while the following questions form an initial focus of the conference:
Which historical lines of development can be traced between the two disciplines, pastoral care and cognitive behavioral therapy? How can the distance and, more recently, the rapprochement between the two be explained and understood?
Theoretical foundations of meaning / religion / spirituality: Which conceptual definitions are necessary for a dialogue?
What can pastoral care learn from cognitive behavioral therapy? What can CBT learn from pastoral care? What approaches are there for a meaningful connection?
Which institutional challenges arise in the cooperation between pastoral care and CBT? How can both professions work together?
What are the fundamental differences between the two disciplinary perspectives (e.g. theoretical assumptions such as anthropology, goal setting, approach, treatment rationale, target groups, methodology)?
What forms are there of including religion / spirituality in therapy or pastoral care and what are the implications and requirements for the professions?
New methods and schools in CBT: What points of contact do they offer for religious and meaning-related questions (e.g. ACT, schema therapy, MBSR)?
What does an in-depth discourse between pastoral care and CBT mean for the future?
Social contexts and developments always determine the interdisciplinary dialogue. In what way do individualization processes, spiritual search movements, religious pluralization, for example, affect pastoral care and CBT?
Further education and training: What theoretical knowledge is necessary on both sides for professional support for patients or those seeking pastoral care?
Practical experience: In what way are pastoral workers and psychotherapists confronted with religious, spiritual and meaning-related questions? How does your own attitude determine the support (e.g. in outpatient / inpatient therapy, in (everyday) pastoral care, in the hospital)?

Aim of the conference: An interdisciplinary dialogue with subsequent publication of the contributions - also a networking of perspectives from practice and theory through the participation of pastors and psychotherapists
Research Interests:
An Empirical Study of Religion in Home Care When and under what conditions can religion serve as a resource in coping with a major life event? In the interdisciplinary dialogue between theology and ... more
An Empirical Study of Religion in Home Care When and under what conditions can religion serve as a resource in coping with a major life event? In the interdisciplinary dialogue between theology and psychology, this question is dealt with using an empirical longitudinal study with qualitative and quantitative methods using the example of caring spouses with the aim of showing the opportunities for networking concepts of religious psychology with practical theology. The results suggest that religion with its potential as a resource and burden in the context of the social system should be differentiated and captured in a multi-dimensional manner. Religion is of ambivalent importance in the everyday life of carers and is dynamically transformed with the partnership-based interaction and the change in living conditions. This opens up impulses for religious research, from which further aspects can be gained for the accompaniment and perception of people in life crises, which are of interest for pastoral care, diakonia, religious psychology and health sciences.
Research Interests: